Conference Information and Schedule

Thank you for your interest in attending the WNY Service-Learning Coalition’s biennial conference.

Registration

Registration for the Unlocking Impact: Keys to Successful Partnerships includes a plenary panel, keynote presentation, 5 breakout sessions, breakfast, and lunch.

Registration is processed through Eventbrite and requires payment at time of registration.  If you need to pay by invoice please contact Rachel Wozniak, Director of the WNY Service-Learning Coalition.

  • Non-Profit Community Partner Registration = $25
  • Undergraduate/Graduate Student Registration = $25
  • Member Institution Registration = $35
    • Member Institutions include faculty/staff/administrators from Buffalo State College, Canisius College, Daemen College, Erie Community College, Hilbert College, Medaille College, Niagara University, and Trocaire College
  • Non-Member Institution Registration = $50

Keynote Speaker

Marisol.headshot-2copy-199x300

Marisol Morales will serve as the Keynote Speaker of Unlocking Impact: Creating Successful Partnerships.

Marisol Morales serves as the Vice President for Network Leadership for Campus Compact, based out of Chicago, Illinois. In this role Morales provides guidance, inspiration, and practical support to network staff across the country, helping state and regional directors achieve local goals while advancing shared network priorities. She leads Campus Compact’s efforts to increase inclusion, equity, and diversity internally and in higher education community engagement. Morales is also the co-host of the bi-weekly Campus Compact podcast, Compact Nation. Prior to joining Campus Compact, Morales was the founding Director of the Office of Civic and Community Engagement at the University of La Verne from 2013-2018 and the Associate Director of the Steans Center for Community-based Service Learning and Community Service Studies at DePaul University from 2005-2013. Marisol holds a BA in Latin American/Latino Studies and a MS/MS in International Public Service Management both from DePaul University. She is currently pursuing her Ed. D in Organizational Leadership at the University of La Verne. Her dissertation is focused on the community engagement experiences of students of color at Minority Serving Institutions.

Schedule Overview

8:00-8:30AM — REGISTRATION, BREAKFAST, AND POSTER PRESENTATIONS

8:30-9:20AM — PLENARY PANEL – EFFECTIVE PARTNERSHIPS: COMMUNITY PARTNER PANEL

9:30-10:25AM — BREAKOUT SESSION #1

10:35-11:30AM — BREAKOUT SESSION #2

11:40AM-12:10PM — BREAKOUT SESSION #3

12:10-12:35PM — LUNCH

12:35-1:45PM — KEYNOTE

2:00-2:55PM — BREAKOUT SESSION #4

3:05-4:00PM — BREAKOUT SESSION #5

4:00-4:30PM — INFORMAL NETWORKING AND COFFEE/COOKIE BAR TO-GO

 

DETAILED SCHEDULE

You can view the detailed schedule of the day below or open the PDF version on your computer or mobile device.

8:00-8:30 REGISTRATION, BREAKFAST, and POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Join WNYSLC steering committee members, our keynote speaker, and attendees for informal networking prior to the start of the conference. Circle the atrium and have an opportunity to view outstanding student and faculty posters and engage in conversations.  

8:30-9:20 PLENARY PANEL – EFFECTIVE PARTNERSHIPS: COMMUNITY PARTNER PANEL

Effective partnerships take time to build and nurture on the part of the faculty and the community partner.  They take time to build a sustainable framework within a community organization in order to support these collaborative efforts with institutions, faulty, and students. Hear from a panel of community partner organizations who have collaborated with multiple higher education institutions to better understand what works best, how they’ve navigated collaborations that are not part of their formal job duties, and why they believe it’s vital for the future of nonprofits and communities to embrace partnerships.  

9:30-10:25 BREAKOUT SESSION #1

The Smart Neighbors Project: A Collaboration Among SUNY Oswego Faculty, Students, and Small Businesses/Nonprofits in Oswego, New York

Joshua Adams, Jacob Dodd, and Stephanie Pritchard, SUNY Oswego
Target Audience: Faculty, Students | Format: Presentation

The Smart Neighbors Project began in 2016 as an ongoing, collaborative, and multidisciplinary effort between classrooms at SUNY Oswego and local independent businesses or nonprofits. For 2018, nine SUNY Oswego faculty participated in the Smart Neighbors Project, which partnered with the H. Lee White Maritime Museum in Oswego, New York. In this presentation, three faculty will discuss their effort to help promote the maritime museum:

  • Joshua Adams’ Intermediate Cinema Production class used student-written screenplays to execute six different productions about the museum;
  • Jacob Dodd’s Cinematography and Motion Picture Editing courses produced, designed and shot short films, which were passed on to the editing students to complete; and
  • Stephanie Pritchard’s Composition students wrote and produced interview-style podcast episodes with staff and volunteers from the museum.

Moving from Involvement to Commitment

Mike Bishop, Cornell University
Target Audience: Faculty, Administrators, Students, Community Partners | Format: Presentation

Perhaps mutually-beneficial experiences for students and community can be shaped around student short-term or one-time involvement. Is it more likely that colleges and universities can do more good when students – and their staff and faculty role models – commit to community partners, fully aware of the risks and sacrifices they assume through this commitment? The leadership program within Engaged Cornell sets high expectations for students to build relationships, enter communities with humility, and critically reflect on their experiences. This interactive workshop will discuss both basic and advanced partnership building, and the role of faculty and staff to mentor students and promote a movement building and collective leadership mindset.

Community as a Counter Space: faculty-student collaborative course design

Katherine Burt and Dr. Ruth Kassel, Siena College
Target Audience: Faculty, Administrators, Students, Community Partners | Format: Presentation

There is a well-established literature on student leadership in institutionalizing civic and community engagement (Battistoni 2011, Zlotkowski 2006) and faculty-student partnership (Healy 2014). Both areas of literature however, point to a need for exploration of faculty-student partnership in course design. We examine three community engaged classes that were co-designed by students and faculty at a private liberal arts college. Interviews with all participants were conducted and analyzed qualitatively. These results indicate that student integration into a community partner organization contributes to a more equitable power dynamic leading to equitable roles in the course design process. This also allowed for the community voice to be integrated more fully into the process. We end with a reflection on the structures put into place to foster the relationship and course design process. Implications for faculty developers, student engagement professionals, and service learning administrators who might want to create structures to support efforts like this on their own campuses are also discussed.

10:35-11:30 BREAKOUT SESSION #2

Reality Checks: Lessons from a School-University Partnership

Bryan Duff, Cornell University and Brandy Nielsen, Tompkins-Seneca-Tioga BOCES
Target Audience: Faculty, Administrators, Students, Community Partners | Format: Presentation

In a collaboration between Tompkins-Seneca-Tioga BOCES and Cornell University, high school students with developmental disabilities spend every weekday morning at the university. Work experiences in dining and other service units alternate with professional and interpersonal skills workshops facilitated by undergraduates. For both groups of students–and their respective professional mentors–the partnership provides significant “reality checks.” For example, undergraduates learn that approaches to communication and preparation that may work in college may not be effective in the community. Similarly, high school students learn that the kind of deep relationships they have with their teachers will not magically appear in the “real world”–that, instead, these relationships must be built with reciprocal effort and learnable strategies. The focus of this workshop will be generating examples of, and catalysts for, useful reality checks that can result from partnerships between higher education and community organizations.

IMPACT on a Community

Patricia Wrobel; Dr. Lynnette Haley O’Stewart; Tom Lowe; Justina Freedman; Elizabeth Yarussi, Brittany DePietro, Niagara University
Target Audience: Faculty, Administrators, Students, Community Partners | Format: Panel

Using a cradle to career model, the Levesque Institute identifies and leverages university and community resources to address four areas that affect residents of Niagara Falls and its surrounding community. The IMPACT model focuses on academic, career, and community integration. The four areas include Early Childhood, Community Outreach, Health & Wellness and Housing. The Institute team will discuss programs within each pillars and their outcomes, as well as how community partners and NU faculty, students and staff are aligned in each area.

Transdisciplinary Research WITH the Community

Ruth Kassel and Dan Moriarty, Siena College
Target Audience: Faculty, Administrators, Students, Community Partners | Format: Presentation

The Siena Project Incubator (SPIn) brings together faculty, students, and community partners in developing three-year research partnerships. To date, faculty from Computer Science, Business, Creative Arts, History, Physics, Environmental Studies, and Economics have come together to build transformative partnerships with co-educational programming and publications in community and academic venues. Topics to be covered include: methods for engaging community and faculty as co-creators of research, the development of student identity and leadership, and strategies for creating projects that necessitate authentic collaboration.

11:40-12:10 BREAKOUT SESSION #3

Innovating in Community Partner and Faculty Development: A Taxonomy for Quality Community Engagement

Laura Hill Rao and Joy Guarino, SUNY Buffalo State
Target Audience: Faculty, Administrators  | Format: Presentation

It is imperative to educate faculty, community partners, and students on quality community engagement practices. Using a variety of tools is critical for success. Learn to utilize a taxonomy for articulating student learning outcomes for quality community engagement.

Partnering with Community Leadership Programs

Jonathan Hilsher,  Alfred State College
Target Audience: Faculty, Administrators, Community Partners  | Format: Presentation

Community leadership organizations exist in cities and counties throughout the United States. They typically focus on building leadership skills and enhancing professional networks for employees of area businesses and organizations. Discover more about these organizations and learn how strategic partnerships with leadership programs can be leveraged to benefit students, faculty/staff, and the larger community.

CW 100 and CW 110 Public Health Service Learning

Jeanie Bryant, Erie Community College and Alex Leader, Erie Community College Student
Target Audience: Students | Format: Interactive Presentation

Our presentation will discuss two service learning projects beginning in our Introductory Public Health course, CW 100, then expanded upon in our CW 110, Behavioral and Social Influences on Public Health. The theme of the projects is homelessness. In the introductory course, our students are introduced to circumstances of the homeless which are tied to course topics. Our students view lectures and materials discussing the work of the organizations Mats for a Mission and Friends Feeding Friends and their work in providing a sleeping mat using the plastic grocery bags and the Friends group distributing the collected toiletries in plastic zip bags known as Blessing Bags at a homeless feeding event In CW 100, plastic bags and toiletries are collected, cut into strips for plarn and blessing bags made. In CW 110 the students will take the blessing bags to the homeless feeding event. Students reflect in a journal 3 times and submit a final project.

AmeriCorps Panel

Justine Duquette
Target Audience: Faculty, Students | Format: Panel

Learn more about the AmeriCorps programs that exist nationwide and what a year of service actually “looks like” from current and past AmeriCorps members.  This panel presentation is geared toward students who have heard of AmeriCorps, but aren’t really sure what it means or what they would actually might be “doing” in the community. Faculty are welcome to attend to learn more about opportunities that exist for their students after graduation that enable them to build professional skills while serving the community as active citizens.

 

12:10-12:35  LUNCH

12:35-1:45 KEYNOTE ADDRESS – MARISOL MORALES

Marisol Morales comes to the conference as an established leader in the field of community engagement. She serves as the Vice President for Network Leadership for Campus Compact, based out of Chicago, Illinois. In this role Morales provides guidance, inspiration, and practical support to network staff across the country, helping state and regional directors achieve local goals while advancing shared network priorities. She leads Campus Compact’s efforts to increase inclusion, equity, and diversity internally and in higher education community engagement. Morales is also the co-host of the bi-weekly Campus Compact podcast, Compact Nation. Prior to joining Campus Compact, Morales was the founding Director of the Office of Civic and Community Engagement at the University of La Verne from 2013-2018 and the Associate Director of the Steans Center for Community-based Service Learning and Community Service Studies at DePaul University from 2005-2013. Marisol holds a BA in Latin American/Latino Studies and a MS/MS in International Public Service Management both from DePaul University. She is currently pursuing her Ed. D in Organizational Leadership at the University of La Verne. Her dissertation is focused on the community engagement experiences of students of color at Minority Serving Institutions.

 

2:00-2:55 BREAKOUT SESSION #4

Cradle to Career…Collective Impact in a ‘Uniquely Urban’ Small Upstate NY Community

Katie Flowers, Hobart and William Smith Colleges and Amy Jackson Sellers, Geneva 2020
Target Audience: Administrators, Community Partners | Format: Presentation

Communities across the country were inspired by the Winter 2011 Stanford Social Innovation Review article “Collective Impact.” The article outlined how Cincinnati, OH organized along the Theory of Action to address K-12 educational equity; Our community has subsequently become affiliated with the nationwide StriveTogether network through the launch of Geneva 2020, our community’s “Cradle to Career” initiative which has helped raise awareness around and engagement in increasing K-12 school success and career preparedness.

Building Story-Based Partnerships

Eve Everette, SUNY Buffalo State
Target Audience: Administrators | Format: Presentation

SUNY Buffalo State’s Anne Frank Project uses story-based education as a vehicle for community building, conflict resolution, and identity exploration. This presentation will examine how story (and story-building) is suitable not only for the stage and the classroom, it also serves as the foundation for collaboration and partnerships. We will take a look at what happens when we put story first in AFP’s local, national, and international initiatives. The supporting workshop guides participants through a story-building exercise that examines the need in your community.

Strategies for engaging campus and community partners while facing challenges of race and equity in communities

Kaylyn Townsend and Sara Smyth Rose Bente Lee Ostapenko Center for Race, Equality, & Mission
Target Audience: Faculty, Administrators, Students, Community Partners | Format: Presentation

This presentation will include information about the importance of engaging with students on and off campus, with campus partners, with community members, and organizations. This presentation will outline effective strategies that are essential to forming sustainable and successful partnerships that are centered around race and equity. These strategies include collaborative decision making skills that increase community support and education about race and equity throughout the U.S. and within diverse communities. Engagement is an important aspect of community partnerships, and this presentation will highlight the importance of engagement at all levels of community.

Additionally, this presentation will emphasize how to develop effective, diverse relationships that can support the experiences of all partners and community members. Lastly, this presentation will include examples of how the Rose Bente Lee Ostapenko Center for Race, Equality and Mission effectively engages diverse communities through a race and equity lens. College students, faculty, staff, administrators and community partners will be able to learn about the importance of beneficial community relationships with college campuses. This presentation will be interactive and participants will be encouraged to apply specific tools and techniques that promote partnerships focused on race and equity.

Canisius College-Community Partnership Projects Panel

Dr. Secil Ertorer, Dr. Erden Ertorer, Dr. Richard Reitsma, Morgan Morris
Target Audience: Faculty, Community Partners, Students | Format: Panel

This panel session will bring students, faculty, and community practitioners together to talk about Canisius college-community partnership projects. Panelists will explain the nature and outcome of the partnerships they have been engaged in (i.e. collaborative research, service learning, internships) from their own and institutional perspectives. Following brief presentations by the panelists, we will engage the audience into a discussion on the benefits and challenges of these partnerships. We would like to hear from the audience about their experiences of collaboration as well their research or service needs, raising questions as the following: What are the needs of your organization? Research? Volunteerism? What are the challenges you face when looking for the ‘right’ partners or working together?

3:05-4:00 BREAKOUT SESSION #5

Utilizing Online Video Technology to Educate and Prepare Faculty, Students, and Community Partners

Laura Hill Rao and Joy Guarino, SUNY Buffalo State
Target Audience: Faculty, Administrators, Community Partners | Format: Presentation

As community engagement involvement grows both in the community and on our local campuses, how do we educate and inform the thousands of community partners, faculty, and students involved in creating and sustaining these important partnerships? The Buffalo State Civic and Community Engagement Office has begun using technology to assist in informing, educating, and preparing individuals involved in community-engaged learning through the use of online videos that are being viewed as a whole, in part, and on individuals own time. Learn how you can utilize these videos in your toolbox to add to your efforts, and how you might create your own instructional and informational videos to deepen understanding.

Preparing Students and Faculty for Working with Vulnerable Populations

Sierra S. Johnston, Compass House
Target Audience: Faculty, Administrators, Students | Format: Presentation

In this workshop, we will explore and unpack our thoughts, feelings, and predispositions in regards to working with our community’s most vulnerable populations. Who are they? How can we identify with them? How can we not identify with them? How might our own privilege and biases get in the way of having successful interactions with clients who have different life experiences from us? From the mindset of cultural humility and intersectionality, we will search for the answers to these questions and more. This workshop will offer an information session, followed by an open discussion.

Children’s Literature at Medaille College and Buffalo City Mission LEAP Program: A Service-Learning Partnership

Alice Villaseñor, Andy Yeager, and Lisa Kragbé, Medaille College, and  Susan Muscato, Buffalo City Mission
Target Audience: Faculty, Community Partners, Students | Format: Panel

We are a team of college faculty, college staff, and community partners who are sharing our experiences working together in a service-learning course partnership. For three years, the students in “Children’s Literature: From Ancient Myth to the Digital Age” at Medaille College have worked with Associate Professor Alice Villaseñor and Library Director Andy Yeager to research age-appropriate books to add to the materials used by LEAP (Literacy Enrichment Afterschool Program) at the Buffalo City Mission.  Villaseñor will discuss how this service-learning project supports the larger course objectives and Yeager will discuss how the course fits into Medaille’s embedded librarian program. Assistant Director of Student Involvement Lisa Kragbé will discuss how the course supports Medaille’s EQUIP Program, which emphasizes community-based learning. Susan Muscato, Director of Education and Training at Buffalo City Mission, will discuss how this course project supports the education and training goals of the Buffalo City Mission.  

 

4:00-4:30 COOKIE and COFFEE BAR

Stay for 3, 10, or 30 minutes for informal networking, as well as a cookie and coffee bar.  Not able to stay long? Not a problem, grab a coffee or cookie for the road as our way of saying thank you for attending this important discussion on community-engagement and partnerships.  

 

This one-day conference is open to community engagement professionals from across western New York and beyond, including:

  • College/university faculty;
  • Undergraduate and graduate students;
  • Nonprofit and community organization administrators and staff;
  • College/university administrators and professional staff